• Kathmandu Durbar Square (Basantapur Darbar Kshetra) in front of the old royal palace of the former Kathmandu Kingdom is one of three Durbar (royal palace) Squares in the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal, all of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

    Several buildings in the Square collapsed due to a major earthquake on 25 April 2015. Durbar Square was surrounded with spectacular architecture and vividly showcases the skills of the Newar artists and craftsmen over several centuries. The Royal Palace was originally at Dattaraya square and was later moved to the Durbar square.[1]
    Kathmandu Durbar Square (Basantapur Darbar Kshetra) in front of the old royal palace of the former Kathmandu Kingdom is one of three Durbar (royal palace) Squares in the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal, all of which are UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Several buildings in the Square collapsed due to a major earthquake on 25 April 2015. Durbar Square was surrounded with spectacular architecture and vividly showcases the skills of the Newar artists and craftsmen over several centuries. The Royal Palace was originally at Dattaraya square and was later moved to the Durbar square.[1]
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  • earthquake dhadhing
    earthquake dhadhing
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  • In the 1920’s and 1930’s the Gurkha regiments formed a significant part of the Garrison of India, and played an active and special role securing its borders and holding its remote regions. In 1935 during that fatal earthquake in Quetta (later called Pakistan) two Gurkhas from 8th Gurkha rifles received the George Cross (previously called the Albert Medal) for extreme bravery not in the face of the enemy.
    In the 1920’s and 1930’s the Gurkha regiments formed a significant part of the Garrison of India, and played an active and special role securing its borders and holding its remote regions. In 1935 during that fatal earthquake in Quetta (later called Pakistan) two Gurkhas from 8th Gurkha rifles received the George Cross (previously called the Albert Medal) for extreme bravery not in the face of the enemy.
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  • Many communities in Nepal consider menstruating women as impure and force mothers and daughters to stay in sheds.

    Nepal: Woman, sons suffocate to death in banned 'menstrual hut'
    ASIA21 December 2018

    At least 21 killed as bus crashes in Nepal's mountainous area
    Police said the bus carrying college students and teachers drove off a highway in a mountainous area.

    At least 21 killed as bus crashes in Nepal's mountainous area
    ABUSE10 December 2018

    Nepal's children at risk: Sexual abuse in the aid sector
    Is the international aid community doing enough to protect children in vulnerable communities?

    Nepal's children at risk: Sexual abuse in the aid sector26:00
    101 EAST6 December 2018

    Nepal's Children at Risk
    Investigating rising fears that Nepal has become a target for paedophiles acting under the cover of aid work.

    Nepal's Children at Risk 26:00
    ASIA4 October 2018

    Nepal bans porn sites to curb sexual violence
    Over 24,000 pornography sites blocked but activists say the real problem is the lack of justice for women.

    Nepal bans porn sites to curb sexual violence
    ASIA2 October 2018

    Fears of violence as Nepal cracks down on Maoist splinter group
    Up to 100 members of Communist Party of Nepal jailed as faction blasts government's dialogue efforts.

    Fears of violence as Nepal cracks down on Maoist splinter group
    NEPAL23 September 2018

    Nepal set to double tiger population under WWF global plan
    Nepal's efforts to increase its tigers are part of a 13-country plan to double the number of tigers worldwide.

    Nepal set to double tiger population under WWF global plan
    ASIA18 September 2018

    Access to Chinese ports a 'huge deal' for Nepal
    Nepal granted access to Chinese ports in a move that will end New Delhi's monopoly over Kathmandu's trade routes.

    Nepal gets access to China ports, analysts say it's a 'huge deal'
    ASIA28 August 2018

    #justicefornirmala: anger spreads in Nepal over police 'cover-up'
    Protests continue in Nepal against alleged police mishandling in the Nirmala Panta rape and murder case.

    #justicefornirmala: anger spreads in Nepal over police 'cover-up'02:05
    NEPAL25 August 2018

    One dead in Nepal rally demanding action over teen's rape, murder
    Police fired at angry protesters in western city of Mahendranagar, killing a teenage boy and injuring dozens.

    One dead in Nepal rally demanding action over teen's rape, murder
    NEPAL22 August 2018

    Nepal urged to repeal new law over press freedom concerns
    New criminal code makes sharing confidential information an offence that deserves prison sentence.

    Nepal urged to repeal new law over press freedom concerns
    NEPAL18 August 2018

    Female activists in Nepal call for equality on citizenship bill
    The proposed bill would could women to have a Nepalese husband to pass on their citizenship to their children.

    Female activists in Nepal call for equality on citizenship bill02:21
    ARTS & CULTURE22 July 2018

    Nepal's stolen gods
    Since the 1980s, authorities estimate thieves have plundered tens of thousands of Nepalese antiquities.

    Nepal's stolen gods
    101 EAST19 July 2018

    Nepal: The Great Plunder
    Investigating how antiquities stolen from the Himalayas end up in museums and private collections around the world.

    Nepal: The Great Plunder 26:00
    Show More
    OPINION
    C K Lal
    After a year of elections, Nepal moves closer to China
    by C K Lal
    Narayan Adhikari
    Nepal's earthquake disaster: Two years and $4.1bn later
    by Narayan Adhikari
    Deepak Adhikari
    The case against: Can journalists be activists?
    by Deepak Adhikari
    Anurag Acharya
    Nepal: A costly constitution
    by Anurag Acharya

    IN-DEPTH
    Climate change threatens 1,000-year-old monastery in remote Nepal
    GLOBAL WARMING
    Climate change threatens 1,000-year-old monastery in remote Nepal
    Nepal's children at risk: Sexual abuse in the aid sector
    ABUSE
    Nepal's children at risk: Sexual abuse in the aid sector
    Fears of violence as Nepal cracks down on Maoist splinter group
    ASIA
    Fears of violence as Nepal cracks down on Maoist splinter group
    Nepal gets access to China ports, analysts say it's a 'huge deal'
    ASIA
    Access to Chinese ports a 'huge deal' for Nepal
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    Many communities in Nepal consider menstruating women as impure and force mothers and daughters to stay in sheds. Nepal: Woman, sons suffocate to death in banned 'menstrual hut' ASIA21 December 2018 At least 21 killed as bus crashes in Nepal's mountainous area Police said the bus carrying college students and teachers drove off a highway in a mountainous area. At least 21 killed as bus crashes in Nepal's mountainous area ABUSE10 December 2018 Nepal's children at risk: Sexual abuse in the aid sector Is the international aid community doing enough to protect children in vulnerable communities? Nepal's children at risk: Sexual abuse in the aid sector26:00 101 EAST6 December 2018 Nepal's Children at Risk Investigating rising fears that Nepal has become a target for paedophiles acting under the cover of aid work. Nepal's Children at Risk 26:00 ASIA4 October 2018 Nepal bans porn sites to curb sexual violence Over 24,000 pornography sites blocked but activists say the real problem is the lack of justice for women. Nepal bans porn sites to curb sexual violence ASIA2 October 2018 Fears of violence as Nepal cracks down on Maoist splinter group Up to 100 members of Communist Party of Nepal jailed as faction blasts government's dialogue efforts. Fears of violence as Nepal cracks down on Maoist splinter group NEPAL23 September 2018 Nepal set to double tiger population under WWF global plan Nepal's efforts to increase its tigers are part of a 13-country plan to double the number of tigers worldwide. Nepal set to double tiger population under WWF global plan ASIA18 September 2018 Access to Chinese ports a 'huge deal' for Nepal Nepal granted access to Chinese ports in a move that will end New Delhi's monopoly over Kathmandu's trade routes. Nepal gets access to China ports, analysts say it's a 'huge deal' ASIA28 August 2018 #justicefornirmala: anger spreads in Nepal over police 'cover-up' Protests continue in Nepal against alleged police mishandling in the Nirmala Panta rape and murder case. #justicefornirmala: anger spreads in Nepal over police 'cover-up'02:05 NEPAL25 August 2018 One dead in Nepal rally demanding action over teen's rape, murder Police fired at angry protesters in western city of Mahendranagar, killing a teenage boy and injuring dozens. One dead in Nepal rally demanding action over teen's rape, murder NEPAL22 August 2018 Nepal urged to repeal new law over press freedom concerns New criminal code makes sharing confidential information an offence that deserves prison sentence. Nepal urged to repeal new law over press freedom concerns NEPAL18 August 2018 Female activists in Nepal call for equality on citizenship bill The proposed bill would could women to have a Nepalese husband to pass on their citizenship to their children. Female activists in Nepal call for equality on citizenship bill02:21 ARTS & CULTURE22 July 2018 Nepal's stolen gods Since the 1980s, authorities estimate thieves have plundered tens of thousands of Nepalese antiquities. Nepal's stolen gods 101 EAST19 July 2018 Nepal: The Great Plunder Investigating how antiquities stolen from the Himalayas end up in museums and private collections around the world. Nepal: The Great Plunder 26:00 Show More OPINION C K Lal After a year of elections, Nepal moves closer to China by C K Lal Narayan Adhikari Nepal's earthquake disaster: Two years and $4.1bn later by Narayan Adhikari Deepak Adhikari The case against: Can journalists be activists? by Deepak Adhikari Anurag Acharya Nepal: A costly constitution by Anurag Acharya IN-DEPTH Climate change threatens 1,000-year-old monastery in remote Nepal GLOBAL WARMING Climate change threatens 1,000-year-old monastery in remote Nepal Nepal's children at risk: Sexual abuse in the aid sector ABUSE Nepal's children at risk: Sexual abuse in the aid sector Fears of violence as Nepal cracks down on Maoist splinter group ASIA Fears of violence as Nepal cracks down on Maoist splinter group Nepal gets access to China ports, analysts say it's a 'huge deal' ASIA Access to Chinese ports a 'huge deal' for Nepal Al Jazeera Facebook Twitter Google+ RSS Podcast YouTube About About Us Press Office Awards Code of Ethics Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Cookie Preferences Community Guidelines Work for us HR Quality Connect Contact Us Apps Social Channel Finder TV Schedule Podcasts Newsletter Submit a Tip Our Channels Al Jazeera Arabic Al Jazeera English Al Jazeera Mubasher Al Jazeera Documentary Al Jazeera Balkans AJ+ Our Network Jetty Al Jazeera Centre for Studies Al Jazeera Media Institute Learn Arabic Al Jazeera Centre for Public Liberties & Human Rights Al Jazeera Forum Al Jazeera Film Festival Al Jazeera Hotel Partners © 2019 Al Jazeera Media Network
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  • Explore Tansen’s fascinating history
    Likened to Darjeeling for its steep roads that climb the hillside, it has its own charm and a rich history. Once the capital of the Magar kingdom of Tanahun under the reign King Mukunda Sen, the kingdom of Palpa had expanded as far as the Koshi River in the east, Gorakhpur in the south and Gulmi and Kaski districts in the west and north respectively. Until the rise of the Shahs, it was one of the most powerful kingdoms in Nepal. It even came close to conquering Kathmandu in the 16th century under the leadership of King Mukunda Sen (1518-1553 AD). Although the power of the Magars waned in the 18th century, Tansen recovered as a Newari trading post on the busy trading route between India and Tibet. In 1806, Prithivipal Sen, the last king of Palpa, was invited to Kathmandu but was a trap and he was beheaded there. Palpa then became part of the Kathmandu kingdom with Tansen the administrative city for the area.

    palpa-tansen-nepal

    Sightseeing: palaces and temples
    There is plenty to see in Tansen. You enter Durbar Square through the huge gate, Baggi Dhoka, where the chariots of religious festivals have to pass through. There are fine woodcarvings on the buildings on both sides of the gate, examples of the fine Newari craftsmanship. Tansen Durbar was built in 1927 by Pratap Shamsher Jang Bahadur Rana and formed the grand palace that was the seat of the Rana governors. Though in January 2006 during the Maoist insurgency it was destroyed, after the abdication of the king a few months later, the palace was one of the first government buildings to be restored. It now houses a small museum.

    Sittalpati, a curious octagonal pavilion can be found in the main square. It was built under the order of Khadga Shamsher, governor of Palpa from 1891- 1902. (Shamsher, an ambitious politician, was exiled from Kathmandu after plotting against the Prime Minister.) In the past, it was used by the governors of Tansen when they had public announcements to make, but now it is a popular spot for locals to hang out and chat. Close by is the oldest temple in town, the two-tiered pagoda style temple of Bhimsen. According to the ‘Mahabharata’ although not a god, Bhimsen was the mightiest hero and Newars worship him like a god for the protection of their property and for when they go on business journeys.

    At the bottom of Asan Tole, there is Amar Narayan Mandir, the large classic three-tiered pagoda style temple is sacred to the Lord Vishnu. It was built in 1807 by the first governor of Tansen, Amar Singh Thapa and is very beautiful with its carved wood deities. The erotic carvings on the wooden structures are remarkable. The temple is surrounded by one meter wide stone wall locally known as the Great wall of Palpa. In the vicinity of the temple, there are two other temples. Mahadev Mandir is found just below, sacred to Shiva and the other is to Vishnu Paduka.

    Bhagawati Temple was rebuilt by Colonel Ujir Singh Thapa, the governor of Palpa in 1815 in commemoration of the victory over colonial British Indian Forces in the battle fought at Butwal. The large temple was damaged by the devastating earthquake in 1935 after which it was renovated in its smaller present size. Close to Bhagawati Temple are three small temples of Shiva, Ganesh and Saraswati, the goddess of wisdom. Every August, a chariot procession of deities is paraded through the town with military honor to observe the historic battle.

    Up of the side of Srinagar Hill, you can find Siddhi Binayak Temple, the temple of the God Ganesh. It is said that the sculptors who came to Tansen from Kathmandu to build Amar Narayan Temple, also carved the figure of an elephant on a big stone. It was given the shape of God Ganesh, whose head according to mythology was replaced by the head of an elephant after he was beheaded by his father, Lord Shiva.

    dhaka-clothing-palpa
    Explore Tansen’s fascinating history Likened to Darjeeling for its steep roads that climb the hillside, it has its own charm and a rich history. Once the capital of the Magar kingdom of Tanahun under the reign King Mukunda Sen, the kingdom of Palpa had expanded as far as the Koshi River in the east, Gorakhpur in the south and Gulmi and Kaski districts in the west and north respectively. Until the rise of the Shahs, it was one of the most powerful kingdoms in Nepal. It even came close to conquering Kathmandu in the 16th century under the leadership of King Mukunda Sen (1518-1553 AD). Although the power of the Magars waned in the 18th century, Tansen recovered as a Newari trading post on the busy trading route between India and Tibet. In 1806, Prithivipal Sen, the last king of Palpa, was invited to Kathmandu but was a trap and he was beheaded there. Palpa then became part of the Kathmandu kingdom with Tansen the administrative city for the area. palpa-tansen-nepal Sightseeing: palaces and temples There is plenty to see in Tansen. You enter Durbar Square through the huge gate, Baggi Dhoka, where the chariots of religious festivals have to pass through. There are fine woodcarvings on the buildings on both sides of the gate, examples of the fine Newari craftsmanship. Tansen Durbar was built in 1927 by Pratap Shamsher Jang Bahadur Rana and formed the grand palace that was the seat of the Rana governors. Though in January 2006 during the Maoist insurgency it was destroyed, after the abdication of the king a few months later, the palace was one of the first government buildings to be restored. It now houses a small museum. Sittalpati, a curious octagonal pavilion can be found in the main square. It was built under the order of Khadga Shamsher, governor of Palpa from 1891- 1902. (Shamsher, an ambitious politician, was exiled from Kathmandu after plotting against the Prime Minister.) In the past, it was used by the governors of Tansen when they had public announcements to make, but now it is a popular spot for locals to hang out and chat. Close by is the oldest temple in town, the two-tiered pagoda style temple of Bhimsen. According to the ‘Mahabharata’ although not a god, Bhimsen was the mightiest hero and Newars worship him like a god for the protection of their property and for when they go on business journeys. At the bottom of Asan Tole, there is Amar Narayan Mandir, the large classic three-tiered pagoda style temple is sacred to the Lord Vishnu. It was built in 1807 by the first governor of Tansen, Amar Singh Thapa and is very beautiful with its carved wood deities. The erotic carvings on the wooden structures are remarkable. The temple is surrounded by one meter wide stone wall locally known as the Great wall of Palpa. In the vicinity of the temple, there are two other temples. Mahadev Mandir is found just below, sacred to Shiva and the other is to Vishnu Paduka. Bhagawati Temple was rebuilt by Colonel Ujir Singh Thapa, the governor of Palpa in 1815 in commemoration of the victory over colonial British Indian Forces in the battle fought at Butwal. The large temple was damaged by the devastating earthquake in 1935 after which it was renovated in its smaller present size. Close to Bhagawati Temple are three small temples of Shiva, Ganesh and Saraswati, the goddess of wisdom. Every August, a chariot procession of deities is paraded through the town with military honor to observe the historic battle. Up of the side of Srinagar Hill, you can find Siddhi Binayak Temple, the temple of the God Ganesh. It is said that the sculptors who came to Tansen from Kathmandu to build Amar Narayan Temple, also carved the figure of an elephant on a big stone. It was given the shape of God Ganesh, whose head according to mythology was replaced by the head of an elephant after he was beheaded by his father, Lord Shiva. dhaka-clothing-palpa
    3
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  • Explore Tansen’s fascinating history
    Likened to Darjeeling for its steep roads that climb the hillside, it has its own charm and a rich history. Once the capital of the Magar kingdom of Tanahun under the reign King Mukunda Sen, the kingdom of Palpa had expanded as far as the Koshi River in the east, Gorakhpur in the south and Gulmi and Kaski districts in the west and north respectively. Until the rise of the Shahs, it was one of the most powerful kingdoms in Nepal. It even came close to conquering Kathmandu in the 16th century under the leadership of King Mukunda Sen (1518-1553 AD). Although the power of the Magars waned in the 18th century, Tansen recovered as a Newari trading post on the busy trading route between India and Tibet. In 1806, Prithivipal Sen, the last king of Palpa, was invited to Kathmandu but was a trap and he was beheaded there. Palpa then became part of the Kathmandu kingdom with Tansen the administrative city for the area.

    palpa-tansen-nepal

    Sightseeing: palaces and temples
    There is plenty to see in Tansen. You enter Durbar Square through the huge gate, Baggi Dhoka, where the chariots of religious festivals have to pass through. There are fine woodcarvings on the buildings on both sides of the gate, examples of the fine Newari craftsmanship. Tansen Durbar was built in 1927 by Pratap Shamsher Jang Bahadur Rana and formed the grand palace that was the seat of the Rana governors. Though in January 2006 during the Maoist insurgency it was destroyed, after the abdication of the king a few months later, the palace was one of the first government buildings to be restored. It now houses a small museum.

    Sittalpati, a curious octagonal pavilion can be found in the main square. It was built under the order of Khadga Shamsher, governor of Palpa from 1891- 1902. (Shamsher, an ambitious politician, was exiled from Kathmandu after plotting against the Prime Minister.) In the past, it was used by the governors of Tansen when they had public announcements to make, but now it is a popular spot for locals to hang out and chat. Close by is the oldest temple in town, the two-tiered pagoda style temple of Bhimsen. According to the ‘Mahabharata’ although not a god, Bhimsen was the mightiest hero and Newars worship him like a god for the protection of their property and for when they go on business journeys.

    At the bottom of Asan Tole, there is Amar Narayan Mandir, the large classic three-tiered pagoda style temple is sacred to the Lord Vishnu. It was built in 1807 by the first governor of Tansen, Amar Singh Thapa and is very beautiful with its carved wood deities. The erotic carvings on the wooden structures are remarkable. The temple is surrounded by one meter wide stone wall locally known as the Great wall of Palpa. In the vicinity of the temple, there are two other temples. Mahadev Mandir is found just below, sacred to Shiva and the other is to Vishnu Paduka.

    Bhagawati Temple was rebuilt by Colonel Ujir Singh Thapa, the governor of Palpa in 1815 in commemoration of the victory over colonial British Indian Forces in the battle fought at Butwal. The large temple was damaged by the devastating earthquake in 1935 after which it was renovated in its smaller present size. Close to Bhagawati Temple are three small temples of Shiva, Ganesh and Saraswati, the goddess of wisdom. Every August, a chariot procession of deities is paraded through the town with military honor to observe the historic battle.

    Up of the side of Srinagar Hill, you can find Siddhi Binayak Temple, the temple of the God Ganesh. It is said that the sculptors who came to Tansen from Kathmandu to build Amar Narayan Temple, also carved the figure of an elephant on a big stone. It was given the shape of God Ganesh, whose head according to mythology was replaced by the head of an elephant after he was beheaded by his father, Lord Shiva.

    dhaka-clothing-palpa
    Explore Tansen’s fascinating history Likened to Darjeeling for its steep roads that climb the hillside, it has its own charm and a rich history. Once the capital of the Magar kingdom of Tanahun under the reign King Mukunda Sen, the kingdom of Palpa had expanded as far as the Koshi River in the east, Gorakhpur in the south and Gulmi and Kaski districts in the west and north respectively. Until the rise of the Shahs, it was one of the most powerful kingdoms in Nepal. It even came close to conquering Kathmandu in the 16th century under the leadership of King Mukunda Sen (1518-1553 AD). Although the power of the Magars waned in the 18th century, Tansen recovered as a Newari trading post on the busy trading route between India and Tibet. In 1806, Prithivipal Sen, the last king of Palpa, was invited to Kathmandu but was a trap and he was beheaded there. Palpa then became part of the Kathmandu kingdom with Tansen the administrative city for the area. palpa-tansen-nepal Sightseeing: palaces and temples There is plenty to see in Tansen. You enter Durbar Square through the huge gate, Baggi Dhoka, where the chariots of religious festivals have to pass through. There are fine woodcarvings on the buildings on both sides of the gate, examples of the fine Newari craftsmanship. Tansen Durbar was built in 1927 by Pratap Shamsher Jang Bahadur Rana and formed the grand palace that was the seat of the Rana governors. Though in January 2006 during the Maoist insurgency it was destroyed, after the abdication of the king a few months later, the palace was one of the first government buildings to be restored. It now houses a small museum. Sittalpati, a curious octagonal pavilion can be found in the main square. It was built under the order of Khadga Shamsher, governor of Palpa from 1891- 1902. (Shamsher, an ambitious politician, was exiled from Kathmandu after plotting against the Prime Minister.) In the past, it was used by the governors of Tansen when they had public announcements to make, but now it is a popular spot for locals to hang out and chat. Close by is the oldest temple in town, the two-tiered pagoda style temple of Bhimsen. According to the ‘Mahabharata’ although not a god, Bhimsen was the mightiest hero and Newars worship him like a god for the protection of their property and for when they go on business journeys. At the bottom of Asan Tole, there is Amar Narayan Mandir, the large classic three-tiered pagoda style temple is sacred to the Lord Vishnu. It was built in 1807 by the first governor of Tansen, Amar Singh Thapa and is very beautiful with its carved wood deities. The erotic carvings on the wooden structures are remarkable. The temple is surrounded by one meter wide stone wall locally known as the Great wall of Palpa. In the vicinity of the temple, there are two other temples. Mahadev Mandir is found just below, sacred to Shiva and the other is to Vishnu Paduka. Bhagawati Temple was rebuilt by Colonel Ujir Singh Thapa, the governor of Palpa in 1815 in commemoration of the victory over colonial British Indian Forces in the battle fought at Butwal. The large temple was damaged by the devastating earthquake in 1935 after which it was renovated in its smaller present size. Close to Bhagawati Temple are three small temples of Shiva, Ganesh and Saraswati, the goddess of wisdom. Every August, a chariot procession of deities is paraded through the town with military honor to observe the historic battle. Up of the side of Srinagar Hill, you can find Siddhi Binayak Temple, the temple of the God Ganesh. It is said that the sculptors who came to Tansen from Kathmandu to build Amar Narayan Temple, also carved the figure of an elephant on a big stone. It was given the shape of God Ganesh, whose head according to mythology was replaced by the head of an elephant after he was beheaded by his father, Lord Shiva. dhaka-clothing-palpa
    3
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  • Earth scientists developing better models for the prediction of weather or for the prediction of earthquakes, landslides, and volcanic eruptions are likewise seeking knowledge that can help avoid the hardships that have plagued humanity for centuries
    Earth scientists developing better models for the prediction of weather or for the prediction of earthquakes, landslides, and volcanic eruptions are likewise seeking knowledge that can help avoid the hardships that have plagued humanity for centuries
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  • A church in Italy, destroyed by an earthquake in 1976, was rebuilt using most of its original cataloged stones that were placed in the exact same positions they were in before it fell.
    A church in Italy, destroyed by an earthquake in 1976, was rebuilt using most of its original cataloged stones that were placed in the exact same positions they were in before it fell.
    1
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  • Project Data Sheet
    Project Name
    Melamchi Water Supply Project
    Project Number
    31624-023
    Country
    Nepal
    Project Status
    Active
    Project Type / Modality of Assistance
    Loan
    Source of Funding / Amount
    Loan 1820-NEP: Melamchi Water Supply Project
    concessional ordinary capital resources lending / Asian Development Fund
    US$ 120.00 million
    Loan 8191-NEP: Melamchi Water Supply Project
    OPEC Fund for International Development
    US$ 13.70 million
    Loan 8235-NEP: Melamchi Water Supply Project
    Nordic Development Fund
    US$ 10.50 million
    Loan: Melamchi Water Supply Project
    MOF, Japan
    US$ 18.00 million
    Japan Bank for International Cooperation (ODA)
    US$ 47.50 million
    Loan 3110-NEP: Melamchi Water Supply Project - Additional Financing
    concessional ordinary capital resources lending / Asian Development Fund
    US$ 25.00 million
    Strategic Agendas
    Environmentally sustainable growth
    Inclusive economic growth
    Drivers of Change
    Private sector development
    Sector / Subsector
    Water and other urban infrastructure and services / Urban policy, institutional and capacity development - Urban water supply

    Gender Equity and Mainstreaming
    Description
    The main objectives of the Project are to alleviate the chronic water shortage in Kathmandu Valley on a sustainable, long-term basis, and to improve the health and well-being of its inhabitants. The Project also seeks to develop a comprehensive institutional framework for urban water management within the valley. The Project comprises (i) infrastructure development; (ii) social and environmental support; (iii) institutional reforms; and (iv) project implementation support.
    Project Rationale and Linkage to Country/Regional Strategy
    Kathmandu Valley is the country's single largest urban economy and is critical to Nepal's economic growth. Water is central to the well-being of the population and the key to its productive capacities. However, current water services are grossly inadequate and unreliable causing many people to resort to tankers supplies, bottled water, and both deep and shallow wells. The trend has led to serious environmental concerns as shallow wells are becoming increasingly polluted and deep aquifers are being mined to produce additional water. Poor water quality impacts sharply on public health. In terms of access to water (in the dry season) and quality of water, the effects are greatest on the health of the poor. The Project provides the required opportunity to address both the acute socioeconomic distress caused by the lack of adequate safe water to Kathmandu Valley residents, and the institutional challenges to provide water and wastewater management services on a sustainable basis.
    Impact
    Health and well-being of the people in Kathmandu Valley improved.
    Project Outcome
    Description of Outcome Shortage of potable water in Kathmandu Valley alleviated.
    Progress Toward Outcome Development outcome is expected to be achieved as per revised schedule by end of 1st quarter of 2019 - 25,915 m of main diversion, 1457m adit and 204 m of H/W diversion tunnel excavation has already been achieved to off-take water from Melamchi river. At Head Works, Open Cut excavation out of 102,000 cubic metre completed to construct diversion weir, desilting basin etc to divert water to Melamchi-Sundarijal tunnel. 667.3 Km of distribution pipe out of 677 Km inside valley completed while 77 Km Bulk Distribution System pipe (Sundarijal WTP to 10 Reservoirs around valley) laying completed. 9.9 km of BDS line from Sundarijal WTP and Mahankal Chaur Reservoir is also tested. Construction of 10 Reservoirs around the valley ongoing under additional financing are at the verge of completion.
    Implementation Progress
    Description of Project Outputs
    A. Melamchi Valley (Suproject 1)

    A.1. Raw water diverted from Melamchi Valley to Kathmandu Valley by development of infrastructure, i.e. tunnel, road and water treatment plant.

    A.2. Social and Environmental Support provided in Melamchi Valley.

    A.3. Efficient project management established and capacity building attained

    B. Kathmandu Valley Subproject (Subproject 2)

    B.1. Institutional reforms achieved and efficiently operated

    B.2. Water distribution and wastewater system improved by provision of capital works

    B.3. Social and environmental support provided in Kathmandu Valley

    Status of Implementation Progress (Outputs, Activities, and Issues)
    A. Melamchi Valley (Subproject 1)

    A.1 MWSDB terminated the previous contract for the Melamchi tunnel on 26 September 2012 due to unsatisfactory performance of the then contractor. As of the date of termination, the physical progress (tunnel excavation) was 22% (6.3 km out of 27.5 km. Rebidding for the Melamchi tunnel Contract started in November 2012. MWSDB issued the letter of acceptance to the winning contractor on 21 June 2013, the contract was signed with Cooperativa Muratorie Cementisti di Ravenna (CMC) of Italy on 15 July 2013, and the letter to commence was issued on 1 October 2013. The initial progress of the new contractor of the Melamchi tunnel is encouraging in terms of mobilization of key personnel, equipment, machinery, materials and start-up activities. Advance payment was made to the contractor in October 2013 and steady progress was achieved until the progress was adversely affected by 25 April 2015 Earthquake and short of construction materials and fuel due to closure of southern Border. However, completion of tunnel excavation with cumulative total of 27,576m tunnel length has been achieved as of 12 April 2018. After several backstopping and monitoring from employer and ADB regarding cash flow problem of contractor, the final works on tunnel smoothed and as of 15 September 2018, 13.7 km invert lining is finished with 12.1 km remaining. Works at H/W with alternative diversion pipe and temporary diversion weir as well as vent shaft works are ongoing. It is expected to be completed by 1st quarter of 2018.

    The water Treatment Plant (WTP) to utilize water from Melamchi tunnel has been implemented with JICA funding. MWSDB and the contractor signed the WTP contract on 10 July 2013. WTP is 100% completed and tested.

    Upgrading construction works in UAR 02 were earlier disturbed due to concerns of some local residents. Now, the works of UAR 02 have been completed.

    Construction of 18-km main access road was completed and opened up between Melamchi Pul Bazar and Timbu.

    A.2. Resettlement Plans and Environmental Management Plan (EMP) were prepared and are under implementation for both Subproject 1 and 2 following the split into two distinct subprojects in 2009. Activities undertaken in Subproject 1 (in Melamchi valley) include several activities for social and economic development of the areas in the Melamchi Valley such as (i) construction of health centers and provision of essential drugs; (ii) construction of school buildings and provision of educational kits to schools; and (iii) a forest nursery in Timbu.

    The social uplift program (SUP) under the MWSP is being implemented to promote widespread, ongoing, and meaningful participation of key stakeholders. Compliance with Resettlement Plan and Environmental Management Plan (EMP) is monitored by the MWSDB with support from the design and supervision consultant (DSC). Further, services of a Safeguards and Social Development Support consultant (SSDS) have also been taken for monitoring at a second level. MWSDB has been specifically asked to ensure compliance with effluent discharge standards.

    A.3 MWSDB is the main agency for project management of Melamchi Subproject 1 (Melamchi tunnel construction). Inputs of project management consultant finished. MWSDB is supported by new design and supervision consultant (DSC). Improved coordination and communication among MWSDB, new DSC, the new contractor (CMC), and the safeguards and social development support consultant (SSDS) noted. All the parties are coordinating to improve the pace, quality, safety, and safeguards compliance of the works. The DSC is taking more proactive role and is actively supporting MWSDB to (i) ensure implementation of the agreed action plans, (ii) decide expeditiously the contractual matters such as claims, variations, etc., (iii) ensure coordination with DSC, contractor, local residents, army and other relevant government authorities, and (iv) monitor processing payments to the contractor in a timely manner. Semi-annual safeguard monitoring reports are regularly being submitted and disclosed.

    B. Kathmandu Valley Subproject (Subproject 2)

    B.1. For Subproject 2, a Project Implementation Directorate (PID-KUKL) has been established since 2009 with staffing from Department of Water Supply & Sanitation and KUKL, which has been carrying out the activities of Subproject 2.

    KUKL has recruited capacity building and public-private partnership (CBP) team in November 2010. With support from this team, KUKL is working to achieving the targets of lease and license agreements. KUKL submitted to WSTFC a new proposal for increase in tariff, which was approved by WSTFC on 14 July 2013 with conditions to be fulfilled by KUKL for service improvement. This will help KUKL in improving its operations and service delivery to citizens.

    B.2. Under Subproject 2, distribution network improvement works are expected to reduce water losses, improve service delivery by enhanced hours and higher pressure of water supply for consumers. The PID for Subproject 2 has awarded 47 contracts out of which 39 contracts have been completed and 8 contracts are about to complete. There are no major issues with implementation of this Subproject. Most of the contracts were completed in 2013 and the remaining contracts by are expected to be completed by end of 2018. Advance preparation of designs and bidding documents for the "Kathmandu Valley Water Supply Improvement, Project," (L2776-NEP) enhanced the readiness of the project. The distribution network improvement works in Kathmandu Valley are being carried out with the objectives of reduction of non-revenue water and improvement of service delivery to the citizens.

    B.3. Substantial improvement in water supply is expected after completion of the Melamchi tunnel by 2016. Safeguards unit has been fully staffed with social development officer, environmental officer, and legal officer. This unit is supervising compliance with safeguards of ongoing physical works with support of supervision consultant.

    Resettlement Plan and Environment Management Plan (EMP) have been prepared and are being implemented. Several teams of consultants have been recruited in accordance with staggered schedules. Semiannual safeguard monitoring reports and environmental report are regularly being submitted and disclosed.

    Geographical Location Ambathan, Bagmati Zone, Bansbari, Bhotechaur, Chandeni, Deupur, Gyalthum, Jaisithok, Kabhre Palanchok, Lamidada, MahankalChaur, Manohara, Melamchi, Nakkhu, Phatkeswor, Ribarma, Sagarmatha Zone, Sindhu, Sundarijal, Timbu, Tinkune
    Safeguard Categories
    Environment A
    Involuntary Resettlement A
    Indigenous Peoples C
    Summary of Environmental and Social Aspects
    Environmental Aspects Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) studies (2000, 2001, 2002) were carried at the time of approval of the Project. In the earlier phase of implementation, compliance with the requirements was regularly monitored by the consultant CEMAT/Schemes JV in association with EEC who submitted their final Environmental Management Plan (EMP) report in 2009. In December 2009, Safeguard and Social Development Support (SSDS) ICON-CMS JV consultant was mobilized. At the first level, MWSDB and DSC are monitoring compliance with environmental safeguards. As the second level, SSDS consultant is monitoring the compliance with EMP such as monitoring water quality, noise quality and air quality, fish population and diversity assessment, measurement of discharge, staff gauge reading and nursery establishment. Environmental monitoring and reporting is ongoing.
    Involuntary Resettlement Involuntary resettlement follows the requirements of ADB and the Government. ADB Policy and Land Acquisition Act (LAA) 2034 (1977 A.D.) are being complied with, such as the provisions related to compensation standards and benefits, compensation for lost assets at market value, provision for alternative land and compensation for standard crops and trees. MWSDB prepared a Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF), approved by the Cabinet in 2057 (2000 A.D.), to cover resettlement-related needs of Project affected persons (PAPs). The Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) compensation and mitigation measures include the following: compensation upon acquisition of land, crop and trees and house or commercial enterprises, mitigation for the loss of water due to diversion to Melamachi River, displacement allowances, rehabilitation measures, loss of government property, loss of community facilities and resources, community losses, and general counseling. Land acquisition process is completed and resettlement monitoring and reporting is ongoing.
    Indigenous Peoples
    Stakeholder Communication, Participation, and Consultation
    During Project Design The Project was designed with extensive participation of stakeholders, including beneficiaries, adversely affected people, village development committees and ward representatives, district development committees and municipal officials and representatives, ministries concerned and MWSDB, the private sector, external funding agencies, NGOs, and consultants.
    During Project Implementation The Project is encouraging direct participation of beneficiaries through social uplift program implementation, representation of adversely affected people in the compensation determination committee, and representation of Kathmandu Valley beneficiaries in water users associations. The Project is also undertaking consensus building at all levels on issues such as water services, environmental and social mitigation and compensation, and employment.
    Business Opportunities
    Consulting Services The selection and engagement of all remaining consulting services to be financed by ADB shall be in accordance with the provisions of Schedule 4, Section D, paras. 10 to 12 of the Amended and Restated Loan Agreement and with the ADB's Guidelines on the Use of Consultants (2007, as amended from time to time) using the quality-and cost-based method.
    Procurement Procurement of all remaining goods and works to be financed out of proceeds of the Loans will be in accordance with ADB's Procurement Guidelines (2007, as amended from time to time).
    Responsible ADB Officer
    Castro-Wooldridge, Vivian
    Responsible ADB Department
    South Asia Department
    Responsible ADB Division
    Urban Development and Water Division, SARD
    Executing Agencies
    Kathmandu Upatyaka Khanepani Limited (KUKL)
    Tripureshwar, Kathmandu, Nepal
    Melamchi Water Supply Development Board
    H.P. Sharma
    Kathmandu, Nepal
    Ministry of Physical Infrastructure and Transport
    Deep Basnyat
    CPMO@DWSS.MOS.COM.NP
    Kathmandu, Nepal
    Ministry of Urban Development
    Mr. Kishore Thapa
    Singhadurbar, Kathmandu, Nepal
    Timetable
    Concept Clearance 08 Mar 1999
    Fact Finding 03 Jul 2000 to 24 Jul 2000
    MRM 15 Sep 2000
    Approval 03 Jul 2008
    Last Review Mission -
    PDS Creation Date 12 Feb 2007
    Last PDS Update 25 Sep 2018
    Loan 1820-NEP
    Milestones
    Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
    Original Revised Actual
    21 Dec 2000 24 Jan 2001 28 Nov 2001 31 Mar 2007 30 Jun 2019 -
    Financing Plan Loan Utilization
    Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
    Project Cost 303.50 Cumulative Contract Awards
    ADB 120.00 21 Dec 2000 126.65 0.00 93%
    Counterpart 118.00 Cumulative Disbursements
    Cofinancing 65.50 21 Dec 2000 130.19 0.00 96%
    Category
    Sector
    Safeguards
    Social
    Financial
    Economic
    Others
    Rating
    Satisfactory
    Satisfactory
    Satisfactory
    Satisfactory
    -
    Satisfactory
    Loan 3110-NEP
    Milestones
    Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
    Original Revised Actual
    11 Feb 2014 07 Apr 2014 25 Apr 2014 30 Jun 2017 30 Jun 2019 -
    Financing Plan Loan Utilization
    Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
    Project Cost 38.08 Cumulative Contract Awards
    ADB 25.00 11 Feb 2014 18.24 0.00 81%
    Counterpart 13.08 Cumulative Disbursements
    Cofinancing 0.00 11 Feb 2014 18.28 0.00 81%
    Category
    Sector
    Safeguards
    Social
    Financial
    Economic
    Others
    Rating
    Satisfactory
    Satisfactory
    Satisfactory
    Satisfactory
    -
    Satisfactory
    Loan 8191-NEP
    Milestones
    Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
    Original Revised Actual
    22 Nov 2000 21 Sep 2001 01 Jul 2002 30 Jun 2003 31 Dec 2008 31 Dec 2008
    Financing Plan Loan Utilization
    Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
    Project Cost 13.70 Cumulative Contract Awards
    ADB 0.00 22 Nov 2000 0.00 13.70 100%
    Counterpart 0.00 Cumulative Disbursements
    Cofinancing 13.70 22 Nov 2000 0.00 13.70 100%
    Loan 8235-NEP
    Milestones
    Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
    Original Revised Actual
    03 Jul 2008 03 Jul 2008 03 Jul 2008 31 Jul 2013 30 Sep 2015 11 Nov 2015
    Financing Plan Loan Utilization
    Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
    Project Cost 10.50 Cumulative Contract Awards
    ADB 0.00 03 Jul 2008 0.00 10.06 100%
    Counterpart 0.00 Cumulative Disbursements
    Cofinancing 10.50 03 Jul 2008 0.00 10.06 100%
    Project Data Sheets (PDS) contain summary information on the project or program. Because the PDS is a work in progress, some information may not be included in its initial version but will be added as it becomes available. Information about proposed projects is tentative and indicative.

    The Public Communications Policy (PCP) recognizes that transparency and accountability are essential to development effectiveness. It establishes the disclosure requirements for documents and information ADB produces or requires to be produced.

    The Accountability Mechanism provides a forum where people adversely affected by ADB-assisted projects can voice and seek solutions to their problems and report alleged noncompliance of ADB's operational policies and procedures.

    In preparing any country program or strategy, financing any project, or by making any designation of, or reference to, a particular territory or geographic area in this document, the Asian Development Bank does not intend to make any judgments as to the legal or other status of any territory or area.

    Project Data Sheet Project Name Melamchi Water Supply Project Project Number 31624-023 Country Nepal Project Status Active Project Type / Modality of Assistance Loan Source of Funding / Amount Loan 1820-NEP: Melamchi Water Supply Project concessional ordinary capital resources lending / Asian Development Fund US$ 120.00 million Loan 8191-NEP: Melamchi Water Supply Project OPEC Fund for International Development US$ 13.70 million Loan 8235-NEP: Melamchi Water Supply Project Nordic Development Fund US$ 10.50 million Loan: Melamchi Water Supply Project MOF, Japan US$ 18.00 million Japan Bank for International Cooperation (ODA) US$ 47.50 million Loan 3110-NEP: Melamchi Water Supply Project - Additional Financing concessional ordinary capital resources lending / Asian Development Fund US$ 25.00 million Strategic Agendas Environmentally sustainable growth Inclusive economic growth Drivers of Change Private sector development Sector / Subsector Water and other urban infrastructure and services / Urban policy, institutional and capacity development - Urban water supply Gender Equity and Mainstreaming Description The main objectives of the Project are to alleviate the chronic water shortage in Kathmandu Valley on a sustainable, long-term basis, and to improve the health and well-being of its inhabitants. The Project also seeks to develop a comprehensive institutional framework for urban water management within the valley. The Project comprises (i) infrastructure development; (ii) social and environmental support; (iii) institutional reforms; and (iv) project implementation support. Project Rationale and Linkage to Country/Regional Strategy Kathmandu Valley is the country's single largest urban economy and is critical to Nepal's economic growth. Water is central to the well-being of the population and the key to its productive capacities. However, current water services are grossly inadequate and unreliable causing many people to resort to tankers supplies, bottled water, and both deep and shallow wells. The trend has led to serious environmental concerns as shallow wells are becoming increasingly polluted and deep aquifers are being mined to produce additional water. Poor water quality impacts sharply on public health. In terms of access to water (in the dry season) and quality of water, the effects are greatest on the health of the poor. The Project provides the required opportunity to address both the acute socioeconomic distress caused by the lack of adequate safe water to Kathmandu Valley residents, and the institutional challenges to provide water and wastewater management services on a sustainable basis. Impact Health and well-being of the people in Kathmandu Valley improved. Project Outcome Description of Outcome Shortage of potable water in Kathmandu Valley alleviated. Progress Toward Outcome Development outcome is expected to be achieved as per revised schedule by end of 1st quarter of 2019 - 25,915 m of main diversion, 1457m adit and 204 m of H/W diversion tunnel excavation has already been achieved to off-take water from Melamchi river. At Head Works, Open Cut excavation out of 102,000 cubic metre completed to construct diversion weir, desilting basin etc to divert water to Melamchi-Sundarijal tunnel. 667.3 Km of distribution pipe out of 677 Km inside valley completed while 77 Km Bulk Distribution System pipe (Sundarijal WTP to 10 Reservoirs around valley) laying completed. 9.9 km of BDS line from Sundarijal WTP and Mahankal Chaur Reservoir is also tested. Construction of 10 Reservoirs around the valley ongoing under additional financing are at the verge of completion. Implementation Progress Description of Project Outputs A. Melamchi Valley (Suproject 1) A.1. Raw water diverted from Melamchi Valley to Kathmandu Valley by development of infrastructure, i.e. tunnel, road and water treatment plant. A.2. Social and Environmental Support provided in Melamchi Valley. A.3. Efficient project management established and capacity building attained B. Kathmandu Valley Subproject (Subproject 2) B.1. Institutional reforms achieved and efficiently operated B.2. Water distribution and wastewater system improved by provision of capital works B.3. Social and environmental support provided in Kathmandu Valley Status of Implementation Progress (Outputs, Activities, and Issues) A. Melamchi Valley (Subproject 1) A.1 MWSDB terminated the previous contract for the Melamchi tunnel on 26 September 2012 due to unsatisfactory performance of the then contractor. As of the date of termination, the physical progress (tunnel excavation) was 22% (6.3 km out of 27.5 km. Rebidding for the Melamchi tunnel Contract started in November 2012. MWSDB issued the letter of acceptance to the winning contractor on 21 June 2013, the contract was signed with Cooperativa Muratorie Cementisti di Ravenna (CMC) of Italy on 15 July 2013, and the letter to commence was issued on 1 October 2013. The initial progress of the new contractor of the Melamchi tunnel is encouraging in terms of mobilization of key personnel, equipment, machinery, materials and start-up activities. Advance payment was made to the contractor in October 2013 and steady progress was achieved until the progress was adversely affected by 25 April 2015 Earthquake and short of construction materials and fuel due to closure of southern Border. However, completion of tunnel excavation with cumulative total of 27,576m tunnel length has been achieved as of 12 April 2018. After several backstopping and monitoring from employer and ADB regarding cash flow problem of contractor, the final works on tunnel smoothed and as of 15 September 2018, 13.7 km invert lining is finished with 12.1 km remaining. Works at H/W with alternative diversion pipe and temporary diversion weir as well as vent shaft works are ongoing. It is expected to be completed by 1st quarter of 2018. The water Treatment Plant (WTP) to utilize water from Melamchi tunnel has been implemented with JICA funding. MWSDB and the contractor signed the WTP contract on 10 July 2013. WTP is 100% completed and tested. Upgrading construction works in UAR 02 were earlier disturbed due to concerns of some local residents. Now, the works of UAR 02 have been completed. Construction of 18-km main access road was completed and opened up between Melamchi Pul Bazar and Timbu. A.2. Resettlement Plans and Environmental Management Plan (EMP) were prepared and are under implementation for both Subproject 1 and 2 following the split into two distinct subprojects in 2009. Activities undertaken in Subproject 1 (in Melamchi valley) include several activities for social and economic development of the areas in the Melamchi Valley such as (i) construction of health centers and provision of essential drugs; (ii) construction of school buildings and provision of educational kits to schools; and (iii) a forest nursery in Timbu. The social uplift program (SUP) under the MWSP is being implemented to promote widespread, ongoing, and meaningful participation of key stakeholders. Compliance with Resettlement Plan and Environmental Management Plan (EMP) is monitored by the MWSDB with support from the design and supervision consultant (DSC). Further, services of a Safeguards and Social Development Support consultant (SSDS) have also been taken for monitoring at a second level. MWSDB has been specifically asked to ensure compliance with effluent discharge standards. A.3 MWSDB is the main agency for project management of Melamchi Subproject 1 (Melamchi tunnel construction). Inputs of project management consultant finished. MWSDB is supported by new design and supervision consultant (DSC). Improved coordination and communication among MWSDB, new DSC, the new contractor (CMC), and the safeguards and social development support consultant (SSDS) noted. All the parties are coordinating to improve the pace, quality, safety, and safeguards compliance of the works. The DSC is taking more proactive role and is actively supporting MWSDB to (i) ensure implementation of the agreed action plans, (ii) decide expeditiously the contractual matters such as claims, variations, etc., (iii) ensure coordination with DSC, contractor, local residents, army and other relevant government authorities, and (iv) monitor processing payments to the contractor in a timely manner. Semi-annual safeguard monitoring reports are regularly being submitted and disclosed. B. Kathmandu Valley Subproject (Subproject 2) B.1. For Subproject 2, a Project Implementation Directorate (PID-KUKL) has been established since 2009 with staffing from Department of Water Supply & Sanitation and KUKL, which has been carrying out the activities of Subproject 2. KUKL has recruited capacity building and public-private partnership (CBP) team in November 2010. With support from this team, KUKL is working to achieving the targets of lease and license agreements. KUKL submitted to WSTFC a new proposal for increase in tariff, which was approved by WSTFC on 14 July 2013 with conditions to be fulfilled by KUKL for service improvement. This will help KUKL in improving its operations and service delivery to citizens. B.2. Under Subproject 2, distribution network improvement works are expected to reduce water losses, improve service delivery by enhanced hours and higher pressure of water supply for consumers. The PID for Subproject 2 has awarded 47 contracts out of which 39 contracts have been completed and 8 contracts are about to complete. There are no major issues with implementation of this Subproject. Most of the contracts were completed in 2013 and the remaining contracts by are expected to be completed by end of 2018. Advance preparation of designs and bidding documents for the "Kathmandu Valley Water Supply Improvement, Project," (L2776-NEP) enhanced the readiness of the project. The distribution network improvement works in Kathmandu Valley are being carried out with the objectives of reduction of non-revenue water and improvement of service delivery to the citizens. B.3. Substantial improvement in water supply is expected after completion of the Melamchi tunnel by 2016. Safeguards unit has been fully staffed with social development officer, environmental officer, and legal officer. This unit is supervising compliance with safeguards of ongoing physical works with support of supervision consultant. Resettlement Plan and Environment Management Plan (EMP) have been prepared and are being implemented. Several teams of consultants have been recruited in accordance with staggered schedules. Semiannual safeguard monitoring reports and environmental report are regularly being submitted and disclosed. Geographical Location Ambathan, Bagmati Zone, Bansbari, Bhotechaur, Chandeni, Deupur, Gyalthum, Jaisithok, Kabhre Palanchok, Lamidada, MahankalChaur, Manohara, Melamchi, Nakkhu, Phatkeswor, Ribarma, Sagarmatha Zone, Sindhu, Sundarijal, Timbu, Tinkune Safeguard Categories Environment A Involuntary Resettlement A Indigenous Peoples C Summary of Environmental and Social Aspects Environmental Aspects Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) studies (2000, 2001, 2002) were carried at the time of approval of the Project. In the earlier phase of implementation, compliance with the requirements was regularly monitored by the consultant CEMAT/Schemes JV in association with EEC who submitted their final Environmental Management Plan (EMP) report in 2009. In December 2009, Safeguard and Social Development Support (SSDS) ICON-CMS JV consultant was mobilized. At the first level, MWSDB and DSC are monitoring compliance with environmental safeguards. As the second level, SSDS consultant is monitoring the compliance with EMP such as monitoring water quality, noise quality and air quality, fish population and diversity assessment, measurement of discharge, staff gauge reading and nursery establishment. Environmental monitoring and reporting is ongoing. Involuntary Resettlement Involuntary resettlement follows the requirements of ADB and the Government. ADB Policy and Land Acquisition Act (LAA) 2034 (1977 A.D.) are being complied with, such as the provisions related to compensation standards and benefits, compensation for lost assets at market value, provision for alternative land and compensation for standard crops and trees. MWSDB prepared a Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF), approved by the Cabinet in 2057 (2000 A.D.), to cover resettlement-related needs of Project affected persons (PAPs). The Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) compensation and mitigation measures include the following: compensation upon acquisition of land, crop and trees and house or commercial enterprises, mitigation for the loss of water due to diversion to Melamachi River, displacement allowances, rehabilitation measures, loss of government property, loss of community facilities and resources, community losses, and general counseling. Land acquisition process is completed and resettlement monitoring and reporting is ongoing. Indigenous Peoples Stakeholder Communication, Participation, and Consultation During Project Design The Project was designed with extensive participation of stakeholders, including beneficiaries, adversely affected people, village development committees and ward representatives, district development committees and municipal officials and representatives, ministries concerned and MWSDB, the private sector, external funding agencies, NGOs, and consultants. During Project Implementation The Project is encouraging direct participation of beneficiaries through social uplift program implementation, representation of adversely affected people in the compensation determination committee, and representation of Kathmandu Valley beneficiaries in water users associations. The Project is also undertaking consensus building at all levels on issues such as water services, environmental and social mitigation and compensation, and employment. Business Opportunities Consulting Services The selection and engagement of all remaining consulting services to be financed by ADB shall be in accordance with the provisions of Schedule 4, Section D, paras. 10 to 12 of the Amended and Restated Loan Agreement and with the ADB's Guidelines on the Use of Consultants (2007, as amended from time to time) using the quality-and cost-based method. Procurement Procurement of all remaining goods and works to be financed out of proceeds of the Loans will be in accordance with ADB's Procurement Guidelines (2007, as amended from time to time). Responsible ADB Officer Castro-Wooldridge, Vivian Responsible ADB Department South Asia Department Responsible ADB Division Urban Development and Water Division, SARD Executing Agencies Kathmandu Upatyaka Khanepani Limited (KUKL) Tripureshwar, Kathmandu, Nepal Melamchi Water Supply Development Board H.P. Sharma Kathmandu, Nepal Ministry of Physical Infrastructure and Transport Deep Basnyat CPMO@DWSS.MOS.COM.NP Kathmandu, Nepal Ministry of Urban Development Mr. Kishore Thapa Singhadurbar, Kathmandu, Nepal Timetable Concept Clearance 08 Mar 1999 Fact Finding 03 Jul 2000 to 24 Jul 2000 MRM 15 Sep 2000 Approval 03 Jul 2008 Last Review Mission - PDS Creation Date 12 Feb 2007 Last PDS Update 25 Sep 2018 Loan 1820-NEP Milestones Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing Original Revised Actual 21 Dec 2000 24 Jan 2001 28 Nov 2001 31 Mar 2007 30 Jun 2019 - Financing Plan Loan Utilization Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage Project Cost 303.50 Cumulative Contract Awards ADB 120.00 21 Dec 2000 126.65 0.00 93% Counterpart 118.00 Cumulative Disbursements Cofinancing 65.50 21 Dec 2000 130.19 0.00 96% Category Sector Safeguards Social Financial Economic Others Rating Satisfactory Satisfactory Satisfactory Satisfactory - Satisfactory Loan 3110-NEP Milestones Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing Original Revised Actual 11 Feb 2014 07 Apr 2014 25 Apr 2014 30 Jun 2017 30 Jun 2019 - Financing Plan Loan Utilization Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage Project Cost 38.08 Cumulative Contract Awards ADB 25.00 11 Feb 2014 18.24 0.00 81% Counterpart 13.08 Cumulative Disbursements Cofinancing 0.00 11 Feb 2014 18.28 0.00 81% Category Sector Safeguards Social Financial Economic Others Rating Satisfactory Satisfactory Satisfactory Satisfactory - Satisfactory Loan 8191-NEP Milestones Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing Original Revised Actual 22 Nov 2000 21 Sep 2001 01 Jul 2002 30 Jun 2003 31 Dec 2008 31 Dec 2008 Financing Plan Loan Utilization Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage Project Cost 13.70 Cumulative Contract Awards ADB 0.00 22 Nov 2000 0.00 13.70 100% Counterpart 0.00 Cumulative Disbursements Cofinancing 13.70 22 Nov 2000 0.00 13.70 100% Loan 8235-NEP Milestones Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing Original Revised Actual 03 Jul 2008 03 Jul 2008 03 Jul 2008 31 Jul 2013 30 Sep 2015 11 Nov 2015 Financing Plan Loan Utilization Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage Project Cost 10.50 Cumulative Contract Awards ADB 0.00 03 Jul 2008 0.00 10.06 100% Counterpart 0.00 Cumulative Disbursements Cofinancing 10.50 03 Jul 2008 0.00 10.06 100% Project Data Sheets (PDS) contain summary information on the project or program. Because the PDS is a work in progress, some information may not be included in its initial version but will be added as it becomes available. Information about proposed projects is tentative and indicative. The Public Communications Policy (PCP) recognizes that transparency and accountability are essential to development effectiveness. It establishes the disclosure requirements for documents and information ADB produces or requires to be produced. The Accountability Mechanism provides a forum where people adversely affected by ADB-assisted projects can voice and seek solutions to their problems and report alleged noncompliance of ADB's operational policies and procedures. In preparing any country program or strategy, financing any project, or by making any designation of, or reference to, a particular territory or geographic area in this document, the Asian Development Bank does not intend to make any judgments as to the legal or other status of any territory or area.
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  • 1934 AD

    Magh (January- February) earthquake, Known as Great Nepal-Bihar Earthquake, struck the Kingdom of Nepal and its surrounding areas around 2 pm on the January 16. The magnitude of the earthquake was 8.4 on the Richter scale. Casualty figures were highest for any recorded earthquake in the history of Nepal. In total 8,519 people lost their lives in Nepal, A total of 126,355 houses were severely damaged and around 80,893 buildings were completely destroyed.

    Total money spent from the earthquake relief fund was NRs 206,500 inside Kathmandu valley only. Earthquake relief fund was established by the king, loans were provided for earthquake-affected people and earthquake volunteers groups were formed.
    1934 AD Magh (January- February) earthquake, Known as Great Nepal-Bihar Earthquake, struck the Kingdom of Nepal and its surrounding areas around 2 pm on the January 16. The magnitude of the earthquake was 8.4 on the Richter scale. Casualty figures were highest for any recorded earthquake in the history of Nepal. In total 8,519 people lost their lives in Nepal, A total of 126,355 houses were severely damaged and around 80,893 buildings were completely destroyed. Total money spent from the earthquake relief fund was NRs 206,500 inside Kathmandu valley only. Earthquake relief fund was established by the king, loans were provided for earthquake-affected people and earthquake volunteers groups were formed.
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  • 1834 AD

    Four major earthquakes were felt in the months of June and July. These earthquakes destroyed or damaged many buildings and temples. However, the extent of damage was much less than the previous ones (i.e., 1833 event). Since there was a lot of rain which commenced and ended with the earthquakes, the search and rescue operations were severely hampered. The Bagmati River was over flooded and a bridge over the river was also swept away. The crops planted near the banks of the rivers were also swept away. There are no records of human or livestock casualties. In total, over 18,000 houses collapsed all over the country.
    1834 AD Four major earthquakes were felt in the months of June and July. These earthquakes destroyed or damaged many buildings and temples. However, the extent of damage was much less than the previous ones (i.e., 1833 event). Since there was a lot of rain which commenced and ended with the earthquakes, the search and rescue operations were severely hampered. The Bagmati River was over flooded and a bridge over the river was also swept away. The crops planted near the banks of the rivers were also swept away. There are no records of human or livestock casualties. In total, over 18,000 houses collapsed all over the country.
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  • 1823AD

    Seventeen earthquake tremors of various magnitudes were felt in the region of Katmandu valley but these shocks probably were smaller relative to the past earthquakes as there was no report of loss of human lives or livestock.
    1823AD Seventeen earthquake tremors of various magnitudes were felt in the region of Katmandu valley but these shocks probably were smaller relative to the past earthquakes as there was no report of loss of human lives or livestock.
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  • 1810 AD

    During the reign of King Girban Yudha Bikram Shah in the months of May or June twenty one shocks of earthquakes in total were felt in Nepal. Although the loss in human lives and cattle were limited, many houses, building and some temples were either destroyed or damaged.
    1810 AD During the reign of King Girban Yudha Bikram Shah in the months of May or June twenty one shocks of earthquakes in total were felt in Nepal. Although the loss in human lives and cattle were limited, many houses, building and some temples were either destroyed or damaged.
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  • 1767 AD

    In months of June and July another significant earthquake hit Nepal. Twenty one shocks and aftershocks of this particular earthquake is said to have occurred in a span of twenty four hours. No written or verbal records survive to indicate any human casualty or the magnitude of sufferings and damages caused.
    1767 AD In months of June and July another significant earthquake hit Nepal. Twenty one shocks and aftershocks of this particular earthquake is said to have occurred in a span of twenty four hours. No written or verbal records survive to indicate any human casualty or the magnitude of sufferings and damages caused.
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  • 1681 AD

    Either on the month of December or January, during the reign King Sri Niwas Malla, another major earthquake hit Nepal and Kathmandu valley. Although very little information is available on this particular earthquake, there was heavy loss lives as well as many buildings, including temples, were either damaged or destroyed.
    1681 AD Either on the month of December or January, during the reign King Sri Niwas Malla, another major earthquake hit Nepal and Kathmandu valley. Although very little information is available on this particular earthquake, there was heavy loss lives as well as many buildings, including temples, were either damaged or destroyed.
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  • 1408AD

    The month August or September of this year saw another major earthquake hit the valley of Kathmandu and the surrounding areas, during the reign of king Shyam Singh. The temple of Rato Matchendranath was completely destroyed while many other temples and buildings collapsed and were damaged. Cracks on land appeared in many places. There was a heavy loss of lives and livestock.
    1408AD The month August or September of this year saw another major earthquake hit the valley of Kathmandu and the surrounding areas, during the reign of king Shyam Singh. The temple of Rato Matchendranath was completely destroyed while many other temples and buildings collapsed and were damaged. Cracks on land appeared in many places. There was a heavy loss of lives and livestock.
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  • 1260 AD

    Next recorded big earthquake after 1255 AD was during the reign of King Jayadev Malla. Many buildings and temples collapsed and many more were severely damaged. Although the exact number of fatalities cannot be confirmed, it said there was heavy loss of life because of the earthquake and the subsequent epidemic and famine.
    1260 AD Next recorded big earthquake after 1255 AD was during the reign of King Jayadev Malla. Many buildings and temples collapsed and many more were severely damaged. Although the exact number of fatalities cannot be confirmed, it said there was heavy loss of life because of the earthquake and the subsequent epidemic and famine.
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  • 1255 AD

    The first recorded earthquake in history of Nepal took place on June 7, 1255 AD. One-third of the total population of Kathmandu were killed including Abahya Malla , the King of Kathmandu valley. Numerous buildings and temples of the valley were entirely destroyed while many of them were severely damaged, the magnitude of the earthquake is said to be around 7.7 in Richter scale
    1255 AD The first recorded earthquake in history of Nepal took place on June 7, 1255 AD. One-third of the total population of Kathmandu were killed including Abahya Malla , the King of Kathmandu valley. Numerous buildings and temples of the valley were entirely destroyed while many of them were severely damaged, the magnitude of the earthquake is said to be around 7.7 in Richter scale
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  • Earthquake in nepal

    Magh (January- February) earthquake, Known as Great Nepal-Bihar Earthquake, struck the Kingdom of Nepal and its surrounding areas around 2 pm on the January 16. The magnitude of the earthquake was 8.4 on the Richter scale. Casualty figures were highest for any recorded earthquake in the history of Nepal
    Earthquake in nepal Magh (January- February) earthquake, Known as Great Nepal-Bihar Earthquake, struck the Kingdom of Nepal and its surrounding areas around 2 pm on the January 16. The magnitude of the earthquake was 8.4 on the Richter scale. Casualty figures were highest for any recorded earthquake in the history of Nepal
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  • rightside temple destory while earthquake came in nepal
    rightside temple destory while earthquake came in nepal
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