• Battle of Guntagadhi where Nepali forces (in black) defeated Tibetan forces
    After 1800, the heirs of Prithvi Narayan Shah proved unable to maintain firm political control over Nepal. A period of internal turmoil followed. Rivalry between Nepal and the British East India Company over the princely states bordering Nepal and British-India eventually led to the Anglo-Nepalese War (1814–16), in which Nepal suffered a heavy defeat. The Treaty of Sugauli was signed in 1816, ceding large parts of the Nepalese controlled territories to the British.


    Bhakti Thapa leading Gorkha men at Anglo-Nepalese War
    Rana rules
    Jung Bahadur Rana was the first ruler from this dynasty. Rana rulers were titled "Shri Teen" and "Maharaja", whereas Shah kings were "Shri Panch" and "Maharajdiraj". Both the Rana dynasty and Shah dynasty are Rajput caste in the Hindu tradition. Jung Bahadur codified laws and modernized the state's bureaucracy. In the coup d'état of 1885, the nephews of Jung Bahadur and Ranodip Singh murdered Ranodip Singh and the sons of Jung Bahadur, stole the name of Jung Bahadur and took control of Nepal. Nine Rana rulers took the hereditary office of Prime Minister. All were styled (self proclaimed) Maharaja of Lamjung and Kaski.

    The Rana regime, a tightly centralized autocracy, pursued a policy of isolating Nepal from external influences. This policy helped Nepal maintain its national independence during the British colonial era, but it also impeded the country's economic development and modernisation. The Ranas were staunchly pro-British and assisted the British during the Indian Rebellion of 1857 and later in both World Wars. At the same time, although Chinese claims, the British supported Nepalese independence at the beginning of the twentieth century.[16]

    In December 1923, Britain and Nepal formally signed a "treaty of perpetual peace and friendship" superseding the Sugauli Treaty of 1816 and upgrading the British resident in Kathmandu to an envoy.

    Slavery was abolished in Nepal in 1924 under premiership of Chandra Shamsher Jang Bahadur Rana.[17]

    Following the German invasion of Poland, the Kingdom of Nepal declared war on Germany on September 4, 1939. Once Japan entered the conflict, sixteen battalions of the Royal Nepalese Army fought on the Burmese front. In addition to military support, Nepal contributed guns, equipment as well as hundreds of thousand of pounds of tea, sugar and raw materials such as timber to the Allied war effort.

    Revolution of 1951
    Battle of Guntagadhi where Nepali forces (in black) defeated Tibetan forces After 1800, the heirs of Prithvi Narayan Shah proved unable to maintain firm political control over Nepal. A period of internal turmoil followed. Rivalry between Nepal and the British East India Company over the princely states bordering Nepal and British-India eventually led to the Anglo-Nepalese War (1814–16), in which Nepal suffered a heavy defeat. The Treaty of Sugauli was signed in 1816, ceding large parts of the Nepalese controlled territories to the British. Bhakti Thapa leading Gorkha men at Anglo-Nepalese War Rana rules Jung Bahadur Rana was the first ruler from this dynasty. Rana rulers were titled "Shri Teen" and "Maharaja", whereas Shah kings were "Shri Panch" and "Maharajdiraj". Both the Rana dynasty and Shah dynasty are Rajput caste in the Hindu tradition. Jung Bahadur codified laws and modernized the state's bureaucracy. In the coup d'état of 1885, the nephews of Jung Bahadur and Ranodip Singh murdered Ranodip Singh and the sons of Jung Bahadur, stole the name of Jung Bahadur and took control of Nepal. Nine Rana rulers took the hereditary office of Prime Minister. All were styled (self proclaimed) Maharaja of Lamjung and Kaski. The Rana regime, a tightly centralized autocracy, pursued a policy of isolating Nepal from external influences. This policy helped Nepal maintain its national independence during the British colonial era, but it also impeded the country's economic development and modernisation. The Ranas were staunchly pro-British and assisted the British during the Indian Rebellion of 1857 and later in both World Wars. At the same time, although Chinese claims, the British supported Nepalese independence at the beginning of the twentieth century.[16] In December 1923, Britain and Nepal formally signed a "treaty of perpetual peace and friendship" superseding the Sugauli Treaty of 1816 and upgrading the British resident in Kathmandu to an envoy. Slavery was abolished in Nepal in 1924 under premiership of Chandra Shamsher Jang Bahadur Rana.[17] Following the German invasion of Poland, the Kingdom of Nepal declared war on Germany on September 4, 1939. Once Japan entered the conflict, sixteen battalions of the Royal Nepalese Army fought on the Burmese front. In addition to military support, Nepal contributed guns, equipment as well as hundreds of thousand of pounds of tea, sugar and raw materials such as timber to the Allied war effort. Revolution of 1951
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  • Simroun Dynasty
    The Simroun, Karnat or Dev Dynasty originated with an establishment of a kingdom in 1097 CE headquartered at present day Simroungarh in Bara District. The kingdom controlled the areas we today know as Tirhoot or Mithila in Nepal and Bihar of India. The rulers of Simroungarh are as follows:

    Nanya Dev - 1097 - 1147 CE
    Ganga Dev - 1147 - 1187 CE
    Narsingh Dev - 1187 - 1227 CE
    Ramsingh Dev - 1227 - 1285 CE
    Shaktisingh Dev - 1285 - 1295 CE
    Harisingh Dev - 1295 - 1324 CE[13]
    Simroun Dynasty The Simroun, Karnat or Dev Dynasty originated with an establishment of a kingdom in 1097 CE headquartered at present day Simroungarh in Bara District. The kingdom controlled the areas we today know as Tirhoot or Mithila in Nepal and Bihar of India. The rulers of Simroungarh are as follows: Nanya Dev - 1097 - 1147 CE Ganga Dev - 1147 - 1187 CE Narsingh Dev - 1187 - 1227 CE Ramsingh Dev - 1227 - 1285 CE Shaktisingh Dev - 1285 - 1295 CE Harisingh Dev - 1295 - 1324 CE[13]
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  • Girija Prasad Koirala
    Birthday: July 4, 1924

    Nationality: Nepalese

    Famous: Prime Ministers Political Leaders

    Died At Age: 85

    Sun Sign: Cancer

    Born In: Saharsa, Bihar, British Raj (Present-Day India)

    Famous As: Former Prime Minister Of Nepal

    Family:
    Spouse/Ex-: Sushma Koirala

    Father: Krishna Prasad Koirala

    Siblings: Bishweshwar Prasad Koirala

    Children: Sujata Koirala

    Died On: March 20, 2010

    Place Of Death: Kathmandu, Nepal
    Girija Prasad Koirala Birthday: July 4, 1924 Nationality: Nepalese Famous: Prime Ministers Political Leaders Died At Age: 85 Sun Sign: Cancer Born In: Saharsa, Bihar, British Raj (Present-Day India) Famous As: Former Prime Minister Of Nepal Family: Spouse/Ex-: Sushma Koirala Father: Krishna Prasad Koirala Siblings: Bishweshwar Prasad Koirala Children: Sujata Koirala Died On: March 20, 2010 Place Of Death: Kathmandu, Nepal
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  • In all of these cultures, weather forecasting became associated with religion and spirituality. Weather such as rain, drought, wind, and cloudiness were associated with a deity, or god. These deities were worshipped in order to ensure good weather. Rain gods and goddesses were particularly important, because rain influenced agriculture and construction projects. Tlaloc (Aztec), Set (Egyptian), and Indra (India), as well as Thor (Norse), Zeus (Greek), and Shango (Yoruba), are only some gods associated with rain, thunder, and lightning.
    In all of these cultures, weather forecasting became associated with religion and spirituality. Weather such as rain, drought, wind, and cloudiness were associated with a deity, or god. These deities were worshipped in order to ensure good weather. Rain gods and goddesses were particularly important, because rain influenced agriculture and construction projects. Tlaloc (Aztec), Set (Egyptian), and Indra (India), as well as Thor (Norse), Zeus (Greek), and Shango (Yoruba), are only some gods associated with rain, thunder, and lightning.
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  • History of Weather Forecasting

    Meteorology is the science of forecasting weather. Weather forecasting has been important to civilizations for thousands of years. Agriculture relies on accurate weather forecasting: when to plant, when to irrigate, when to harvest. Ancient cultures—from the Aztecs of Mesoamerica to the Egyptians in Africa and Indians in Asia—became expert astronomers and predictors of seasonal weather patterns.
    History of Weather Forecasting Meteorology is the science of forecasting weather. Weather forecasting has been important to civilizations for thousands of years. Agriculture relies on accurate weather forecasting: when to plant, when to irrigate, when to harvest. Ancient cultures—from the Aztecs of Mesoamerica to the Egyptians in Africa and Indians in Asia—became expert astronomers and predictors of seasonal weather patterns.
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  • The most humid places on Earth are islands near the Equator. Singapore, for instance, is humid year-round. The warm air is continually saturated with water from the Indian Ocean.
    The most humid places on Earth are islands near the Equator. Singapore, for instance, is humid year-round. The warm air is continually saturated with water from the Indian Ocean.
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  • Pakistan vs Indian😂😂😂😂
    Pakistan vs Indian😂😂😂😂
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  • History of the Queen’s Truncheon
    The history of the Truncheon dates back to the time of the Indian Mutiny when The Sirmoor Battalion (later the 2nd KEO Gurkha Rifles) particularly distinguished itself by holding the Ridge during the siege of Delhi. Here they fought along side the 60th Rifles. During the prolonged action all its officers and 327 of its 490 other ranks became casualties.
    History of the Queen’s Truncheon The history of the Truncheon dates back to the time of the Indian Mutiny when The Sirmoor Battalion (later the 2nd KEO Gurkha Rifles) particularly distinguished itself by holding the Ridge during the siege of Delhi. Here they fought along side the 60th Rifles. During the prolonged action all its officers and 327 of its 490 other ranks became casualties.
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  • Gurkhas shared this honour with Rajputs, Mahrattas, Pathans, Sikhs and other chosen representatives of the British Indian Army. In 1910 these Indian Orderly Officers (two of whom were Gurkhas at the time) took their turn with the officers of the Household Cavalry and the Foot Guards to stand guard at the catafalque in the Great Hall of Westminster at the King’s Lying-in-State. Rudyard Kipling immortalised this event in a short story called “In the Presence”.
    Gurkhas shared this honour with Rajputs, Mahrattas, Pathans, Sikhs and other chosen representatives of the British Indian Army. In 1910 these Indian Orderly Officers (two of whom were Gurkhas at the time) took their turn with the officers of the Household Cavalry and the Foot Guards to stand guard at the catafalque in the Great Hall of Westminster at the King’s Lying-in-State. Rudyard Kipling immortalised this event in a short story called “In the Presence”.
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  • From the time of his Coronation in 1901 King Edward VII commanded that he be attended by six Indian Army Orderly Officers. The year following the Coronation the number was reduced to four, and from that time onwards until the outbreak of war in 1939, the four ‘King’s Indian Orderly Officers’ were annually in attendance on the Sovereign.
    From the time of his Coronation in 1901 King Edward VII commanded that he be attended by six Indian Army Orderly Officers. The year following the Coronation the number was reduced to four, and from that time onwards until the outbreak of war in 1939, the four ‘King’s Indian Orderly Officers’ were annually in attendance on the Sovereign.
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