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Now that a “female ******” could soon be on people’s nightstands, a cardiologist said older people, particularly women, should be aware that the bedroom is often the first place to detect early symptoms of heart disease.To get more news about http://www.vigrxplus-original.com/ where to buy vigrx plus, you can visit vigrxplus-original.com official website.

That’s particularly true for sedentary people whose only real physical activity is sexual intercourse, Laxmi Mehta, a cardiologist at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center, said.

With the Food and Drug Administration’s approval this month of a medication designed to boost a woman’s waning libido, Mehta said couples should be on alert for five “bedroom symptoms” of possible heart disease.

These include snoring, experiencing heart palpitations while at rest and having chest pain during intercourse. For men, erectile dysfunction can signal underlying heart problems; for women, it’s hot flashes.While some of the symptoms are directly tied to sexual activity, others can appear first in the bedroom, precisely because people are at rest and can more readily detect subtle changes in their heartbeat, Mehta said. (Of course, this can be true of people who are just reading or watching television, too, she added.)

Hot flashes, for example, may signal that a woman is no longer producing estrogen, which has protective benefits for the heart, Mehta said.

Hot flashes generally occur after women go through menopause, which usually begins in a woman’s 50s. It can also occur in younger women who have undergone hysterectomies or whose ovaries cease producing the hormone because of other reasons. The reason it’s important in regard to cardiovascular health is that, until menopause begins, women have a lower risk of heart disease than men. About 10 years after the cessation of their menstrual periods, however, women’s risk of heart disease is about equal with men’s, Mehta said.
Experiencing hot flashes at an early age or during an accelerated menopause is therefore a good reason a woman should check up on her cardiac health, Mehta said. Plus, hot flashes occur more often at night for some women, she said.

Hot flashes in the bedroom is an important thing, and sometimes women having hot flashes is a reason women don’t like having intercourse, so it’s a bedroom issue,” Mehta said in an interview Friday.

For men, erectile dysfunction can sometimes be a telltale sign of heart disease, she said, as both conditions share some of the same symptoms. So a man who has trouble getting or maintaining an erection should be screened for cardiovascular health, she said.

For both sexes, snoring cannot only disturb one’s partner but also be a sign of underlying heart trouble. That’s because snoring is often linked to sleep apnea, which can contribute to high blood pressure and abnormal hearth rhythms that can trigger strokes or heart failure, she said.Snoring is sort of like a taboo topic. Nobody wants to talk about snoring, especially women. [They] never want someone to tell them they’re snoring,” Mehta said. “But it’s sometimes related to sleep apnea . . . So it’s an important to ask your partner, ‘Do I snore?’ ”

The bedroom can sometimes be the first place where people detect heart palpitations, she said. That’s because when people are up and about during the day, their hearts are beating more rapidly in general and they’re often preoccupied and don’t notice shifts to their heartbeat.

“I have a lot of patients — predominantly women, but men too — who complain that they feel fine, except when they lie down and want to go bed and they’re in a resting state and they notice their heart racing or skipping or pounding or flip-flopping,” Mehta said.
With ‘female Viagra’ coming Now that a “female Viagra” could soon be on people’s nightstands, a cardiologist said older people, particularly women, should be aware that the bedroom is often the first place to detect early symptoms of heart disease.To get more news about http://www.vigrxplus-original.com/ where to buy vigrx plus, you can visit vigrxplus-original.com official website. That’s particularly true for sedentary people whose only real physical activity is sexual intercourse, Laxmi Mehta, a cardiologist at Ohio State’s Wexner Medical Center, said. With the Food and Drug Administration’s approval this month of a medication designed to boost a woman’s waning libido, Mehta said couples should be on alert for five “bedroom symptoms” of possible heart disease. These include snoring, experiencing heart palpitations while at rest and having chest pain during intercourse. For men, erectile dysfunction can signal underlying heart problems; for women, it’s hot flashes.While some of the symptoms are directly tied to sexual activity, others can appear first in the bedroom, precisely because people are at rest and can more readily detect subtle changes in their heartbeat, Mehta said. (Of course, this can be true of people who are just reading or watching television, too, she added.) Hot flashes, for example, may signal that a woman is no longer producing estrogen, which has protective benefits for the heart, Mehta said. Hot flashes generally occur after women go through menopause, which usually begins in a woman’s 50s. It can also occur in younger women who have undergone hysterectomies or whose ovaries cease producing the hormone because of other reasons. The reason it’s important in regard to cardiovascular health is that, until menopause begins, women have a lower risk of heart disease than men. About 10 years after the cessation of their menstrual periods, however, women’s risk of heart disease is about equal with men’s, Mehta said. Experiencing hot flashes at an early age or during an accelerated menopause is therefore a good reason a woman should check up on her cardiac health, Mehta said. Plus, hot flashes occur more often at night for some women, she said. Hot flashes in the bedroom is an important thing, and sometimes women having hot flashes is a reason women don’t like having intercourse, so it’s a bedroom issue,” Mehta said in an interview Friday. For men, erectile dysfunction can sometimes be a telltale sign of heart disease, she said, as both conditions share some of the same symptoms. So a man who has trouble getting or maintaining an erection should be screened for cardiovascular health, she said. For both sexes, snoring cannot only disturb one’s partner but also be a sign of underlying heart trouble. That’s because snoring is often linked to sleep apnea, which can contribute to high blood pressure and abnormal hearth rhythms that can trigger strokes or heart failure, she said.Snoring is sort of like a taboo topic. Nobody wants to talk about snoring, especially women. [They] never want someone to tell them they’re snoring,” Mehta said. “But it’s sometimes related to sleep apnea . . . So it’s an important to ask your partner, ‘Do I snore?’ ” The bedroom can sometimes be the first place where people detect heart palpitations, she said. That’s because when people are up and about during the day, their hearts are beating more rapidly in general and they’re often preoccupied and don’t notice shifts to their heartbeat. “I have a lot of patients — predominantly women, but men too — who complain that they feel fine, except when they lie down and want to go bed and they’re in a resting state and they notice their heart racing or skipping or pounding or flip-flopping,” Mehta said.
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